Ex-Convicts Voting Rights By Tré Gunter

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History of Voting By Tre G.


1776 When this country announced its independence from Britain, voting rights were based on property ownership. This typically meant that those voting were white males over the age of 21 of Protestant religion.
1787 In the newly drafted Constitution, states were given the power to set voting mandates and most were still favorable to white males who owned property.
1830 Many states had dropped religion and property ownership as requirements for voting and with such a large percentage of the population at the polls, political parties were beginning to develop.
1868 The 14th Amendment recognizes African Americans as citizens, giving them the right to vote. However, state officials continue attempts to deny this right.

1870 African Americans were given the right to vote in the 15th Amendment. It prohibited any state or local government from denying that right.
1890 Wyoming becomes the first state to recognize women's right to vote and provide for it in a state constitution.
1913 Voting power is expanded with 17th Amendment, calling for the popular election of US. senators.
1920 The 19th Amendment was added to the Constitution, giving women across the nation the right to vote.

1940 Congress recognizes Native Americans as citizens. However, it wasn't until 1947 that all states granted them the right to vote.
1964 The 24th Amendment declares that no person should be denied the right to vote because they cannot pay a "poll tax."
1965 An amendment to the Voting Rights Act bans the use of literacy tests, poll taxes and other obstacles designed to keep people from voting.
1971 The voting age is lowered to 18.
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